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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 41  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 265-272

Effects of auditory and visual interference control on visuospatial working memory in children with ADHD


1 Department of Occupational Therapy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
2 Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University; University Research Facility in Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
3 Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Supaporn Chinchai
Department of Occupational Therapy, Chiang Mai University
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmedsci.jmedsci_10_20

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Background: Interference control is the cognitive control needed to prevent interference due to competition of relevant and irrelevant information that closely related to working memory. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of auditory and visual interference control on visuospatial working memory of children with ADHD. Methods: The participants included thirty children with ADHD and thirty normal control children aged 7–12 years old. All children took the computerized test of visuospatial working memory assessment. The test comprised the N-back and running Memory tasks divided into three conditions: noninterference, auditory interference, and visual interference in three levels of difficulty. Results: The results revealed that there was a significant difference in N-back with auditory interference (t = 2.13, P = 0.04) and N-back with visual interference task (t = 2.48, P = 0.02) between normal control children and children with ADHD. However, there was no significant difference in N-back with noninterference task (t = 1.61, P = 0.11) between normal control children and children with ADHD. There was a significant difference in running memory with noninterference (t = 5.34, P ≤ 0.001), running memory with auditory interference (t = 6.23, P ≤ 0.001), and running memory with visual interference task (t = 5.86, P ≤ 0.001) between normal control children and children with ADHD. In addition, the comparison of the mean score revealed that children with ADHD had poorer performance of interference control on visuospatial working memory tasks than normal control children in overall tasks. Conclusion: Children with ADHD exhibited inefficient control over themselves, especially in the interference condition tasks in which they performed more error responses when interacting in the tasks. The present study supports the evidence-based mechanisms of auditory and visual interference control in visuospatial working memory of children with ADHD.


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